About Us

Platinum Sky Travel’s goals are to create and provide our customers with a wealth of first-hand experience from all corners of the globe. We believe in going above and beyond for our clientele, as this will illustrate the factors of a reliable trustworthy business. Quite simply, we listen to what you want, and carefully design an individual trip to match, working to their budget and with an absolute commitment to quality. Our Specialists will focus on looking after our clients, total travel needs, show you the highlights in a different light, and introduce you to places and experiences that others might miss. Which will reflect on the most iconic times and create unforgettable moments, which will last a life time.

07980 123857 (24 hours)

89 Caerphilly Road, Birchgrove, Cardiff, CF14 4AE.

info@platinumskytravel.com

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Spain - Platinum Sky Travel
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Spain

Spain, officially the Kingdom of Spain, is a country mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe. The country's mainland is bordered to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea except for a small land boundary with Gibraltar; to the north and northeast by France, Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west and northwest by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean. Spanish territory includes two large archipelagoes, the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea and the Canary Islands off the African Atlantic coast, two cities, Ceuta and Melilla, on the African mainland and several small islands in the Alboran Sea near the African coast. Spain is the only European country to have a border with an African country.

Passionate, sophisticated and devoted to living the good life, Spain is both a stereotype come to life and a country more diverse than you ever imagined. 

 An Epic Land 

Spain’s diverse landscapes stir the soul. The Pyrenees and the Picos de Europa are as beautiful as any mountain range on the continent, while the snowcapped Sierra Nevada rises up improbably from the sun-baked plains of Andalucía; these are hiking destinations of the highest order. The wildly beautiful cliffs of Spain’s Atlantic northwest are offset by the charming coves of the Mediterranean. And everywhere you go, villages of timeless beauty perch on hilltops, huddle in valleys and cling to coastal outcrops as tiny but resilient outposts of Old Spain. That’s where the country’s charms are most likely to take hold. 

 A Culinary Feast 

Food and wine are national obsessions in Spain, and with good reason. The touchstones of Spanish cooking are deceptively simple: incalculable variety, traditional recipes handed down through the generations, and an innate willingness to experiment and see what comes out of the kitchen laboratory. You may experience the best meal ever via tapas in an earthy bar where everyone’s shouting, or via a meal prepared by a celebrity chef in the refined surrounds of a Michelin-starred restaurant. Either way, the breadth of gastronomic experience that awaits you is breathtaking and sure to be highlight of your trip.  

Art Imitates Life 

Poignantly windswept Roman ruins, cathedrals of rare power and incomparable jewels of Islamic architecture speak of a country where the great civilisations of history have risen, fallen and left behind their indelible mark. More recently, what other country could produce such rebellious and relentlessly creative spirits as Salvador Dalí, Pablo Picasso and Antoni Gaudí and place them front and centre in public life? And here, grand monuments of history coexist alongside architectural creations of such daring that it becomes clear Spain’s future will be every bit as original as its past.  

Fiestas & Flamenco 

For all the talk of Spain’s history, this is a country that lives very much in the present and there’s a reason ‘fiesta’ is one of the best-known words in the Spanish language – life itself is a fiesta here and everyone seems to be invited. Perhaps you’ll sense it along a crowded, post-midnight street when all the world has come out to play. Or maybe that moment will come when a flamenco performer touches something deep in your soul. Whenever it happens, you’ll find yourself nodding in recognition: this is Spain. 

 

Spain Mainland

Spain Balearic Islands

East of the Spanish mainland, the four chief Balearic Islands – Ibiza, Formentera, Mallorca and Menorca – maintain a character distinct from the rest of Spain and from each other.

 Ibiza is wholly unique, its capital Ibiza Town is loaded with historic interest and a draw for thousands of clubbers and gay visitors, while the north of the island has a distinctly bohemian character. Tiny Formentera has even better beaches than its neighbour and makes up in rustic charm what it lacks in cultural interest. Mallorca, the largest and best-known Balearic, battles with its image as an island of little more than sun, booze and high-rise hotels.

 In reality, you’ll find all the clichés, most of them crammed into the mega-resorts of the Bay of Palma and the east coast, but there’s lots more besides: mountains, lovely old towns, some beautiful coves, and the Balearics’ one real city, Palma. Mallorca is, in fact, the one island in the group you might come to other than for beaches and nightlife, with scope for plenty of hiking. And finally, to the east, there’s Menorca – more subdued in its clientele, and here, at least, the modern resorts are kept at a safe distance from the two main towns, the capital Maó, which boasts the deepest harbour in the Med, and the charming, pocket-sized port of Ciutadella.

Catalan is spoken throughout the Balearics, and each of the three main islands has a different dialect, though locals all speak Castilian (Spanish).

Spain Canary Islands

Looming volcanoes, prehistoric sites, lush pine forests, lunar landscapes, sandy coves and miles of Sahara-style dunes. Yes, there is another world beyond the Canaries' seafront resorts.

A Dramatic Landscape 

The Canary Islands boast near-perfect year-round temperatures, which means whether it’s summer or winter you can enjoy the dramatic and varied landscape here that you usually have to cross continents to experience. Marvel at the subtropical greenery of La Gomera’s national park, the pine-forested peaks in Gran Canaria’s mountainous interior or the tumbling waterfalls of La Palma. Then contrast all this lushness with the extraordinary barren flatlands flanking Tenerife’s El Teide, the surreal play of colours of Lanzarote’s lava fields and Fuerteventura’s endless plains, punctuated by cacti, scrub and lots (and lots) of goats.  

Be a Good Sport 

It is this very diversity of landscape, coupled with those predictable sunny days, that makes outdoor activities so accessible and varied. Hike the signposted footpaths that criss-cross the islands, ranging from meandering trails to mountains treks; scuba dive in enticing warm waters, marvelling at more than 350 species of fish (and the odd shipwreck); or pump up the adrenalin by riding the wind and the waves – kitesurfing, windsurfing and surfing are all big here. Slow down the pace with camel rides, rounds of golf, horse treks and boat rides.

A Dramatic Landscape 

The Canary Islands boast near-perfect year-round temperatures, which means whether it’s summer or winter you can enjoy the dramatic and varied landscape here that you usually have to cross continents to experience. Marvel at the subtropical greenery of La Gomera’s national park, the pine-forested peaks in Gran Canaria’s mountainous interior or the tumbling waterfalls of La Palma. Then contrast all this lushness with the extraordinary barren flatlands flanking Tenerife’s El Teide, the surreal play of colours of Lanzarote’s lava fields and Fuerteventura’s endless plains, punctuated by cacti, scrub and lots (and lots) of goats.  

Be a Good Sport 

It is this very diversity of landscape, coupled with those predictable sunny days, that makes outdoor activities so accessible and varied. Hike the signposted footpaths that criss-cross the islands, ranging from meandering trails to mountains treks; scuba dive in enticing warm waters, marvelling at more than 350 species of fish (and the odd shipwreck); or pump up the adrenalin by riding the wind and the waves – kitesurfing, windsurfing and surfing are all big here. Slow down the pace with camel rides, rounds of golf, horse treks and boat rides.